Your browser identified itself as a version of IE that was often shipped with default settings that were less than secure. Your internet experience could be made more secure by opening Internet Options in your browser, going to the Advanced tab and looking under the security settings for "Use TLS 1.1" and "Use TLS 1.2". Ensure these are turned on (checked). Doing so will enable your browser to support a higher quality of encryption on this and other websites. You will still be able to browse this site without turning on support for TLS 1.1 and 1.2, but we will have to use a lower level of encryption to accomodate you. See this question on Stack Exchange's Superuser forum from 2011 for more details keeping in mind the comments about TLS 1.2 non-support were made many years ago, and things have changed since then.

If the support for better cryptography has been turned on for your browser, thank you, and you can safely ignore this advisory.

Browser Security Alert

We’ve seen it in countless horror movies. The good guys, on the run from a homicidal maniac, barricade themselves inside a house. They booby-trap the yard, seal off the doors, and board up the windows, only to discover that the killer is already INSIDE THE HOUSE.

As familiar as the plotline might be in slasher films, it’s even more common in the world of cybersecurity. Organizations spend millions on firewalls, intrusion detection systems, and other perimeter defenses, only to find that their sensitive data is being compromised by their own employees and business partners.

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Consider a typical AES encryption key: 256 binary digits, arranged into one of an unthinkably large number of possible combinations. You feel safe using that key, because you know that it would take every computer in the world, working nonstop for longer than the age of the universe, to produce that exact same combination of digits. Assuming you keep it protected, the only people who will ever know the key are the ones who are supposed to have it.

But have you ever stopped to wonder where exactly that combination of digits came from? The people trying to steal your data may be wondering the same thing.

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Six months ago, the New York State Department of Financial Services formally adopted a set of cybersecurity requirements for banks, insurance companies, and other financial services companies that operate in New York. These requirements, commonly known as NYCRR 500, represent the first real cybersecurity law in the United States. After an initial 180-day transition period, several of the law's provisions are now in effect.

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Even when you know you’re doing things right, it’s nice to get external validation, especially when it comes from experts in the field. That’s why we’re thrilled to report that PKWARE is listed three separate times in the latest Gartner Hype Cycle Reports for Threat-Facing Technologies.

The Gartner report, which focuses on technologies that protect enterprise IT infrastructure against advanced cybersecurity threats, lists PKWARE by name in three categories: format-preserving encryption, enterprise key management, and database encryption.

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