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Search Results

Assuming joe is required, and sturonas is required, and with Blog as Category , the following results were found.

  • How to Politely Talk Politics When it Comes to Enterprise Security

    The other day, I broke a social rule among polite company. I talked politics.

    https://www.pkware.com/blog/how-to-politely-talk-politics-when-it-comes-to-enterprise-security
  • Top 3 HIMSS Takeaways

    I recently presented at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society – North Carolina Chapter – where I talked about the importance of securing data within the healthcare industry. During my time at the conference, I kept my ear to the...

    https://www.pkware.com/blog/top-3-himss-takeaways
  • Safe and Sound (When No One is Paying Attention)

    The worlds of fantasy and security have collided twice recently, once in practice and the other in principle.

    https://www.pkware.com/blog/safe-and-sound-when-no-one-is-paying-attention
  • What’s the Cost of Encryption in England? A Big Mac Index for Security

    After all the buzz and blimey out of London Tech Week and Interop London 2015, I was ready for a Big Mac. Typical American, right! The Big Mac I’m thinking of is more related to economics than any McDonald’s pink slime concoction.

    https://www.pkware.com/blog/what-s-the-cost-of-encryption-in-england-a-big-mac-index-for-security
  • The Invisible Cities of Data Security Curiosities: Report from Gartner Security and Risk Summit 2015

    Between flights from D.C. to New York to Milwaukee to London, I wanted to share a kind of wild anecdote from this week’s Gartner Security and Risk Summit.

    https://www.pkware.com/blog/the-invisible-cities-of-data-security-curiosities-report-from-gartner-security-and-risk-summit-2015
  • The Key that Unlocks Esperanto

    As any student or traveler can attest, learning a new language is hard. How about making one up?

    https://www.pkware.com/blog/the-key-that-unlocks-esperanto
  • Four Disruptive Hacks to Come in 2015

    While out in Maryland to talk security with a few government contractors, I realized I was stopped at the intersection of “Snowden River Parkway” and “Broken Land Drive.” The Parkway is named for a Revolutionary War sea captain and not Edward, the...

    https://www.pkware.com/blog/four-disruptive-hacks-to-come-in-2015
  • First Principles of Data Security: The 4 Key Questions You Need to Be Asking

    Looking at the volume of recent data breaches, it appears that malicious hackers are becoming increasingly savvy. Maybe. But the more likely cause is that miscreants are walking through doors left open by a legacy of bad security practices – or they...

    https://www.pkware.com/blog/first-principles-of-data-security-the-4-key-questions-you-need-to-be-asking

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